Weekly Reflections

Reflection for Oct. 13, 2013

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Through God we are made whole ... just for the asking

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"His flesh became again like the flesh of a little child, and he was clean of his leprosy."

2 Kings 5:14-17

"'Jesus, Master! Have pity on us!' ... As they were going they were cleansed."

Luke 17: 11-19

by Sister Sally Ann Brickner

Within Israelite society purity laws carried great significance. Persons who had certain physical diseases, such as leprosy, were considered unclean and were segregated from the community. They lacked wholeness and therefore were ritually impure.

Our culture also possesses standards of physical (and moral) cleanliness and those who do not meet the standards are often shunned. They are not welcome in certain establishments. They may be turned down for employment. They are considered "unfit."

Having been cleansed of his leprosy, Naaman returned to Elisha with profound gratitude. Likewise, the Samaritan who was healed of leprosy returned to Jesus with humble thanksgiving. Having been cleansed through God's mercy, these individuals could resume normal relationships within their community.

At times we also are in need of physical or moral healing.  If we seek God's boundless mercy, God makes us whole again. Like Naaman and the Samaritan, we are able to reintegrate joyfully with our community.


Celebrating the 'Year of Faith'

Moral Life -- Applying the Seventh and Eighth Commandments

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About this series
DID YOU KNOW: The first Three Commandments concern love and fidelity to God, while the other seven speak of love and forgiveness of neighbor as an expression of God's love.

Chapters 31 & 32, US Catholic Catechism for Adults

Do Not Steal; Act Justly.
Tell The Truth.

by Sister Laura Zelten

Reflecting on the Seventh and Eighth Commandments, the most essential factor in making good decisions is to follow Christ, to put Christ first in all moral decisions. St. Francis de Sales put it this way, "One of the most excellent intentions that we can possibly have in all our actions is to do them because our Lord did them."

"Truth, beauty, and goodness reflect the nature of God,
and through them, we participate in the life of God."

Study Guide for the U.S. Catholic Catechism

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